Click here for more information about:  WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ISHTAR? My Passionate Quest To Find Answers For Generations Of Defeated Mothers   and 15***** Reviews

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Anne Frandi-Coory 2010

Anne Frandi-Coory  works from her home studio in Melbourne as a painter, poet, short story writer and book reviewer. In 2010 she published the bestselling Whatever Happened To Ishtar? A Passionate Quest To Find Answers for Generations Of Defeated Mothers. It is a raw and powerful memoir woven into her Italian and Lebanese family history, over-arched with the detrimental effects  patriarchal Catholic Church dogma inflicted on generations of women and children.

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In poignant words and  with vibrant  brush strokes, Anne Frandi-Coory’s poetry, short stories, and artworks, reflect many of these same timeless  issues of mental illness, child abuse, and abandonment in DRAGONS, DESERTS and DREAMS.

Anne paints larger than life canvases, and writes wonderful poetry, evoking the colourful imaginations of children, with whom she has a deep affinity. Her second book, DRAGONS, DESERTS and DREAMS published  in 2017, contains a selection of her paintings, poems and short stories and is now available from…

AMAZON  and other online stores

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A few reviews for Dragons, Deserts and Dreams

 

“Congratulations on your creation ‘Dragons, Deserts and Dreams’ and the profound and beautiful effect it has on others. I will treasure my copy forever and share the stories with my children too!” – Jamie Bellamy, NSW. 11 May 2018

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“I have to tell you that I am delighted, impressed and overwhelmed by ‘Dragons, Deserts and Dreams’.  I recently took this marvellous book with me on holiday to Malta, and I dipped and splashed in it, more than I did in the sea.

I have now read “Jack, and His Mammoth Imagination” to my two grandsons.  They enjoyed it so much that I had to read it twice over. How’s that for unabashed critical judgement?  This story occupies the same nonsensical zone as that occupied by Edward Lear and Lewis Carroll.”  – Denis Betro UK. 10 May 2018

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“Please read this beautiful book Dragons, Deserts and Dreams done by Anne Frandi-Coory … gorgeous poems with amazing pictures of herself and also fantastic Art: Anne,  one word: AMAZING!”

– Lilla Benigno, Australia

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Dragons, Deserts and Dreams is gorgeous, and the paintings and photos are extraordinary. This must have taken some time to collate and to proof! I have a feeling I’m going to need all the tissues in the box while I’m reading it. I also believe people are going to love your book.  It is unique, I love the format and it will make an impact.”

– Luciana Cavallaro, Australia

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“Each poem in Dragons, Deserts and Dreams, is a brief, evocative episode of life…”

-Zita Barna, Australia

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“I have it, I so love Dragons, Deserts and Dreams 🙂  This book is always beside me like now”

– Shan Klohs, Australia

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Immigration And The Promise – I love this moving piece on immigration in ‘Dragons, Deserts and Dreams’, by Anne Frandi-Coory … This is quality story-telling”  

-Mark Swain UK

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Please visit Anne Frandi-Coory’s Facebook page here:

Dragons, Deserts and Dreams

 

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More reviews for Dragons, Deserts and Dreams here: including Goodreads 

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*Residents in other countries can purchase DRAGONS, DESERTS and DREAMS 

Here from AMAZON 

or other online stores

*****Please feel free to contact the author at anytime by leaving a comment at the bottom of this page*****

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62 comments
  1. frandi said:

    I’m honoured to be in such talented company x x x

    Like

  2. Tony Farry. said:

    Hi Anne,my name is Tony Farry( Fakhri),I am from Dunedin and lived across the road from your Grandparents,as a child I spent a lot of time over there,with your uncle Phi taking me on plumbing jobs with him and fond memories of your Aunties,feeding me up as long as I spoke Lebanese to them.Would have some wonderful stories to tell you and if u feed me I could give u some scandal (HAHAHAH) Someone told me you are in Melb.is this correct? if so will be there early March if u wish to catch up.
    Regards Tony.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anne said:

      Hello Tony. Across the road at 67 Carroll St? Wow. Who are your parents or grandparents, not that I know many Farrys personally?

      Like

      • Tony Farry. said:

        Hi Anne ,gee that was quick,lived “up the lane” at 46 Carrol St.Parents were Fred and Maria,Grandparents where not in N.Z.

        Like

  3. A very moving tribute [Jacob’s Bridge Across Time]. Thank you for sharing this.

    Steve

    Like

  4. mytwocentsandme said:

    how long does it take to write each poem? probably not long since u’re a pro with rhymes right? 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anne said:

      Hello there….nice to see you on my blog. Once I begin writing a poem the words just flow out of me – sometimes in a few minutes, and at times, I do wonder where it’s all coming from. Having said that, I have to be on my own and in the right space; I wait until the verse comes into my mind. Sometimes I paint a picture first and then write the poem, sometimes it happens the other way around. I have only started painting and writing in the last three years, after writing ‘Whatever Happened To Ishtar?’. The writing must have had a cathartic effect on me.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Hello! I’d never have discovered your blog, had I not been researching the possibility of adding audio to mine.

    Well, I found a beautiful tribute, in the form of a poem [Jacob’s Bridge Across Time], on the other end of the link. I both read it and listened to it. VERY moving. I never had the pleasure of meeting either of my grandfathers (and neither left a diary).

    I am inspired. Thanks and Peace be to you and yours. Beth

    Like

  6. Hi there. Yes, I am lucky to have known my grandfather, even for such a very short time. Good luck with your audio.

    Like

  7. Dian said:

    Hello Anne, this [Jacob’s Bridge Across Time] reminds me with my the only one grandfather, I miss him so much. Thank you for sharing your beautiful poem.

    Like

  8. Anne said:

    Grandfathers can have such a positive influence upon our lives; I’m so pleased you could relate to my poem.

    Liked by 1 person

    • latinoscorp said:

      That’s [Jacob’s Bridge Across Time] a challenge to me as a grandpa! Thank you for letting me know.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Hi Anne, Just come across this poem while looking for something else. Its lovely and so is your painting. You are obviously enjoying your new found talents and everyone is enjoying them. Will you publish your poems ? Take care and keep up the good work.
    Rita.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Anne said:

    Thank you, Rita. I am looking forward to starting my next painting. I think I might do another Italian scene – I’ll keep you posted x x

    Liked by 1 person

    • . Thanks Anne. By the way, I am going to send you an email soon because something prompted me to read your book Ishtar again. O.K. XX

      Liked by 1 person

      • Anne said:

        okay….

        Like

  11. O.K. and Thanks for the likes on my blog about Ancient Scripts. I am really enjoying learning the scripts. What are you doing for Christmas this year ?

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Anne said:

    Hello Rita. Family and friends are all going to a beautiful park this Christmas day. We will take cold turkey, salads, fresh bread, Christmas cake etc and there’s plenty of space for the children to play. Everyone will contribute food, so no stress. How about you and John?

    Like

    • Hi Anne, Your Xmas sounded wonderful hope you enjoyed it. John and I had Xmas lunch at one of our friends house along with 8 other friends whom we play dominoes with throughout the year. Likewise, each contribute Xmas goodies. I make the mince pies, the trifle and the Xmas pudding. Our hosts provide the main Xmas turkey dinner. ‘ YUMMY’ Of course we all buy each other small gifts. But before this. I Skype my family including grandchildren and see them all opening their presents. So all in all Xmas is Great. John and I wish you and your lovely family A very happy and prosperous New Year 2015.
      Rita.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Hi
    What a fantastic , inspirational story [Immigration and The Promise], really enjoyed it,
    Are there any more I can see
    Thanks
    Ray Thompson

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Anne said:

    Hello there Ray. Thanks for the lovely comment. You might like to read more of my short life stories – see menu at top right of this page.

    Like

  15. Verna said:

    Hi Anne, I came across your story while I was researching Ateo Frandi, born 04 May 1873, died 06 May 1915. I have in my possession a WW1 medal with his name inscripted on it. It was issued in 1911 for his long service in the Colonial Auxiliary Forces. I would dearly love for it to be returned to his family, he has no direct issue but if you know of a family member I can pass it onto I would appreciate it…. Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anne said:

      Hello Verna.,.lovely to hear from you. I would so love that medal and I would treasure it as would my family. My mother, Doreen was very close to Italia, Ateo’s sister, and Italia and Ateo were devoted to each other. Otherwise,I truly don’t know anyone else to recommend. Thank you for making contact.

      Like

      • Verna said:

        Ok …. How do I get it to you … email me at ………………..

        Liked by 1 person

      • Anne said:

        Really? I didn’t expect that you would agree. Thank you so much xx I will email you tomorrow.

        Like

  16. Verna said:

    Good morning Anne,
    I have not heard from you via my email today so I thought I would try again through here.
    I realise you might be thinking that maybe this is some sort of hoax, but I can assure you that I do have the medal and I am very much hoping to be able to return it to his family, where it rightfully belongs,(after 100 years).
    I can tell you it came into my possession through my Grandmother, how she happened to have it I do not know, but she kept it safe along with her first husbands WW1 medals. This year being significant for WW1 veterans, I was going through all the paper work and medals and as this medal did not have a ribbon, I was going to have it re-ribboned, it was only then that I noticed Ateo’s name inscripted on the side and I thought I would try and locate his family to return it.
    The inscription reads….”No. 179 COL-SERG. A. FRANDI ZEALANDIA RIFLES (1911)”
    Please let me know where you want me to send it
    Thanks Verna

    Liked by 1 person

  17. John Shears said:

    Hello Anne,
    I have connected to your blog when looking for information about the Zealandia Rifles from the early 1900’s in Wellington NZ.
    My late Father-in Law was in the Zealandia Rifles, Frank Hubert Woodward,and in 1916 he married Helena Currange as you have noted in your family tree.
    I notice that the surname Karentze is linked to Currange and wonder if you are able to tell me how that came about as I am unable to find out in my searches on the net.
    I have some other information that may interest you also.
    What a great piece of research you have done congratulations.

    Like

  18. Anne said:

    As far as I know it’s an Austrian name. Currange the Anglicised version. I hope that helps. Thanks for your fine praise…glad you found my blog. Helena was pregnant when she died. I will contact you with my email address tomorrow, would love to know more.

    Like

  19. John Shears said:

    Thanks Anne, that is another little mystery solved. Look forward to your email.
    John

    Like

  20. bronwyn fox said:

    Hi Anne, was interesting to stumble on to your site. My partner is Paul Frandi, his father is Bryan Frank Frandi. If you would like an update of this family line for your tree I’m sure Paul will be able to assist. He was most interested in your blog with Verna regarding Ateos’ medal as last year Paul went with his son to Waiouru Army Museum and this was discussed .

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Anne said:

    Hello Bronwyn, so nice to hear from you. I have met Bryan and his wife some time ago in Christchurch. I would love to hear more from you and if you would like a copy of our family tree I am happy to send you one. I will contact you by private email.

    Like

    • bronwyn fox said:

      Thanks for reply, Paul would love a copy of the family tree thanks. Regrettably, Bryan passed away 13 November 2013. His wife Jenny still resides in Christchurch.

      Like

  22. Chrissy said:

    I felt this one [Jacob’s Bridge Across Time] reminded me of my Greek grandfather and all the stories he told me as well as the way he held my hand throughout my life (I still fell him, even though he is long gone.) Thank you for the lovely words.
    Chrissy

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anne said:

      Thank you, Chrissy. Now I take on my role as a grandmother with pride and joy because I realise how important that role is. As my daughter says, grandparents help bring their grandchildren up and much of what we do stays with the children forever. Even though I was only eight when my grandfather died, he had a profound effect upon my life. 💝💖

      Liked by 2 people

  23. Thanks for liking my comment on common friend Luc’s post, which in turn has enabled my connect with your world of poems and pics. The imaginary bridge connecting you with your grandad [Jacob’s Bridge Across Time] may well be a reality, Anne, in some point of time in distant futurity, whereby future generations, after our exit from this planet, would visit us, and vice versa. Reading your poem did indeed breathe life into possibility of such an enabling time machine. I look forward to reading more of your poems..,best wishes.. Raj.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anne said:

      Yes, I too believe in the journeys of souls after death. I am so pleased you enjoy my poetry 💖

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Mary Glass, Dunedin. said:

    Anne – your book has just been given to me by my daughter in Australia. I have not started reading it yet, although I have skimmed some areas. I will read it. We have in common having been brought up at St Vincents. I was born in 1944, just a little older than you, and would like to contact you. Would you be agreeable. I would give you my email address.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anne said:

      Yes, Mary, I would love to make contact with you. I will forward my email address. Regards, Anne

      Like

  25. Joanne Dowden said:

    Hi Anne, I stumbled across your website whilst I was researching my own ancestors. A relative of mine, I believe, worked for Italia Frandi Corich in her business as a dressmaker at Fern Glen, 16 Murphy Street, Wellington in the early 1900’s. Is it possible, that you may have further information regarding this? If so, I would be most appreciative of any information you may be able to share with me. Kindest regards Joanne

    Like

  26. Anne said:

    No, I am sorry to say, Joanne, I haven’t heard of anyone who assisted Italia with her dressmaking. However, another person reading this comment may know about it.

    Like

  27. Anne said:

    Thank you …and thank you for following my blog

    Like

  28. Alan Feasey said:

    Hi Anne
    I’m Michelle Downie’s cousin our Mums were sisters & I have inherited the family tree, I can give you details of Dawn & Marguerites’ birth etc if you want.I am adding Reg’s sisters to my tree & would like to use your photos to complete the tree which I will forward to Michelle.
    Regards Alan

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Anne said:

    Hello Alan
    Yes, you may use those photos you need, but could you please acknowledge that you downloaded them from my blog. Thank you for asking permission. Also thank you for your offer, but I have all the info I need on births, deaths and marriages. Anne xx

    Like

  30. Jade Barnett said:

    Hi Anne,
    Assunta Mary Pierotti was my great great grandmother, I was wondering if you had any more information you would like to share as I am in the process of writing my own book about my families history.

    Regards,
    Jade Barnett

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anne said:

      Hello Jade, good luck with your book.

      I only know Assunta’s story from her marriage to Francesco Frandi up until she left him for another man, and the personal accounts from Frandi family members, and Assunta’s sister Italia (Kate) Russo, when all helped raise the young children Assunta left behind in New Zealand. I have written about these family memoirs in my book ‘Whatever happened To Ishtar?’ Also, there is some information on this blog under the heading: Italian Connections; our ancestral short stories.

      Like

  31. Madeline Cook said:

    Hi Anne,

    i work for a New Zealand production company called Storybox. We are currently working on a project about the bells in the Wellington Carillon. We would like to you some of the photo’s of Ateo that are on your blog. I have left my email address and the companies website, could you please email me directly for a more in-depth description of the project.
    Kind regards

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Anne said:

    Hello Madeline, thank you for requesting information about Ateo Frandi…I will contact you via email – Anne

    Like

  33. Captain Ateo ‘Little Arthur’ Frandi

    Hi Anne,

    Just stumbled across your 2014 article re the Long Service medal named to Ateo, found by Verna Crowley of Otaki. If you havent already been apprised of exactly what it is, I can tell you – I am in the FREE business of reuniting military medals with families.

    THE MEDAL

    The medal is the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal (CAFLSM).

    HISTORY OF LONG SERVICE MEDALS FOR VOLUNTEERS

    The Volunteer Long Service Medal (VLSM) was instituted in 1894 as an award for long service by other ranks in the part-time Volunteer Force of the United Kingdom. In 1896, the grant of this medal was extended by Queen Victoria to members of Volunteer Forces throughout the British Empire and a separate new medal was instituted, the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies.

    The CAFLSM was instituted by Queen Victoria in 1899 as a military long service award for part-time members of all ranks in any of the organised military forces of the British Colonies, Dependencies and Protectorates throughout the British Empire. The medal gradually superseded the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies in all these territories, with the exception of the Isle of Man, Bermuda and the Indian Empire.

    In 1930, the CAFLSM along with the Volunteer Long Service Medal, the Volunteer Long Service Medal for India and the Colonies, the Militia Long Service Medal, the Special Reserve Long Service and Good Conduct Medal and the Territorial Efficiency Medal, were superseded by the Efficiency Medal in an effort to standardise recognition across the Empire.

    QUALIFYING SERVICE

    The CAFLSM could be awarded for TWENTY years of service as a part-time member of any rank in any of the Colonial Auxiliary Forces. Qualifying service could be had by serving in the forces of more than one Colony or Protectorate. Service in the Militia and Volunteer Forces of the United Kingdom was also reckonable (added), so long as at least half of all qualifying service had been rendered in the forces of the Dominion, Colonies or Protectorates. Service on the West Coast of Africa counted as double time. Service on the permanent staff was not reckonable.

    Officers holding the CAFLSM who were subsequently awarded the Colonial Auxiliary Forces OFFICERS’ DECORATION were not required to surrender the medal, but were not permitted to wear it any more until such time as the full periods of service required for both decoration and medal were completed.

    On 25 January 1923, the Royal Warrant was amended in respect of part-time members who had actually served, or accepted the obligation of serving, beyond the boundaries of the Dominions, Colonies, Dependencies or Protectorates during the First World War. Service on the active list during WW1 was counted as DOUBLE when reckoning the qualifying service towards the requisite twenty years, whether such service was in the Naval Forces, Military Forces or Air Forces, e.g. 6mths on active list (not necessarily at war overseas) counted as 12mths qualifying service towards the 20 yrs required for the the award of the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal.

    Kind regards

    Ian – Medals Reunited New Zealand©

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anne said:

      Thank you Ian, for taking the time to post this information on my blog. Ateo’s other descendants will be interested in learning more about his long service medal, especially his great nephew to whom I gave the medal.

      Liked by 1 person

      • My pleasure Anne. The era these medals were produced was a confusing one as there were a number that to the uninitiated appear to be the same among the 18 different long service medals issued by the UK and NZ between 1895-1940ish. There were four versions of Long Service medals of Ateo’s type alone that transitioned 3 sovereigns – Victoria, Edward VII and George V.

        Ateo’s medal was the Edward VII version (apologies, I said Geo in the my previous comment) of which there were 2 types identified by the little claw that the ribbon suspender is attached to the medal by. There is a single-toe and a double double-toe claw – Ateo’s is the later. The sovereigns head (Victoria, Edward VI George V) was the only way to tell the difference as the wording on the other side was the same although ER VII words were set in an ornate frame on the medal.

        The medal itself to a collector is quite valuable (in good condition with ribbon, NZ$350-$550) since most militia & volunteer medals only had a short life in medal terms before being transitioned either by amendments to their Royal Warrant, or by being made obsolete and replaced with a new award.

        The Edward VII CAFLSM having a life of only 30yrs before it was made obsolete meant that Ateo had to be serving at least from 1910 otherwise he would have got the replacement award, the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers Decoration (OD).

        If he did qualify for the OD, he would have had to remove the CAFLSM. (maybe the reason it was found?) We know Ateo was a Captain in 1911 so he would have had to serve at least until 1931 to get the OD, depending when he enlisted.
        If no OD, all 20 qualifying years would have to have started at the latest by 1910.

        The only way to know whether Ateo’s medal was obsolete or valid, is to know his enlistment date, length of service as a soldier/NCO, length of service as an officer, date he was commissioned, and his date of Discharge. Confused?

        Kind regards

        Ian

        Liked by 1 person

      • Anne said:

        Not confused at all, Ian, and thanks once again. It does make sense as to why the medal was found in the collection of a non-relative. I know that Ateo was a military man through and through and although he was born in Italy, he was very loyal to New Zealand.
        Regards
        Anne

        Like

  34. Last comment Anne,

    Ateo’s titles:

    1891, Jan to 1911 >>> 179 Private to Sergeant – Wgtn City Volunteer Rifles; Zealandia Rifle Volunteers

    1911 up to 18 Jan >>> 179 Colour Sergeant AGL Frandi – ‘G’ Company, 1st Battalion Wellington Rifles.

    1911 from 19 Jan >>> 179 Captain AGL Frandi – 31st Company, Senior Cadets, the Office i/c YMCA Cadets, Wellington

    1914 enlisted WW1 >> 10/1169 Captain AGL Frendi – 9th Company, Wellington Infantry Battalion, NZEF – 2nd Reinforcements

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    I have worked the medal stuff out … I first went through the military service files of all five Frandi brothers, all of whom served in WW1 with only Alfred Joseph serving during WW2 as well (and also his son Reginald but of course he was a generation later).
    These gave me a good sense of what military service the family had been involved with however I found an additional file of Arteo’s in the NZ Archives which ran into 96 pages and gave me the answers I needed. The other useful clue was the photo on your blog of Ateo sitting wearing a sword and the date year 1912 which confirmed my findings.

    In the photo [Ateo] is a Captain and is wearing two medals. 1912 is the year the NZ Volunteer Militia system transitioned to the NZ Territorial Force. Ateo had enlisted in the Wellington City (Volunteer) Rifles on 19 Jan 1891 as a Private. By Feb 1902 he was a Sgt and had completed 11yrs 41days of “Efficient” volunteer service. To be passed as Efficient in any one year, a soldier had to attend so many training days and attend an annual camp, plus pass all the requisite skills required of them – then the could be recorded as being “Efficient”.

    Accordingly, in 1903 Sgt Frandi was awarded the NZ Volunteer Service Medal (inst1902-1911, plain khaki ribbon) for completing 12 years of Efficient service. His next award came four years later in 1907 having completed 16 years of Efficient service. At that point he (still a Sergeant) the NZ Volunteer Long and Efficient Service Medal (inst 1887-1931, maroon ribbon with two central white stripes).

    In 1911, having now completed 20 years and 15 days Efficient Volunteer & Territorial service, Ateo applies for the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal (CAFLSM) – it is approved. This medal replaced the 16 years NZ LESM in 1911.

    The two medals Ateo is wearing in the photo (dated 1912) is the 12 year NZ VSM (plain khaki ribbon) and the 20 year CAFLSM (plain dark green ribbon). This is proven by the design on the back of the medal posted on your blog (GR VII version). I cannot see any particular reason why he should not also be wearing the 16 yr NZ LESM as well unless. That was 1907….

    So – the question, where his NZ LESM (maroon/two white stripes) might be now?

    It also means the CAFLSM that was found was NOT obsolete, it was a valid medal to be wearing until Ateo’s death.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    In Mar 1910 Ateo, now a Colour Sergeant, transferred from the Wgtn City Rifles to the Zealandia Rifles Wgtn to start a new company of Cadets.

    In Mar 1911 Ateo applies to be commissioned after 20 yrs of Volunteer service. This is where his file gets interesting. Ateo is commissioned in 1912 and almost immediately sits and passes his Captain’s promotion exam thereby confirming him in rank. Defence commissions a civilian (nil mil experience and not qualified by exam) also in the rank of Capt however with seniority for rank greater than Ateo’s! Result – to say Ateo is irate is an understatement as his file shows. Ateo resigns from the Volunteer Force after a flurry of public protestations. A public war of words erupts, covered in the NZ Times of the day (I guess even a man’s career wrangles with his boss was newsworthy in 1910s Wgtn).

    Ateo writes to General Godley (head of NZ Military Forces then) …. the arguments for/against are all published in the newspapers ……… my take is that Ateo was technically in the right BUT, he was trying to overturn an entrenched Army policy …. junior officers’ never win those battles … you have to read his file to grasp it all (see NZ Times, see 20 Sep 1912) ….. The net result – Ateo publicly withdraws his resignation via public letter to Godley, and is reinstated.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Ateo enlists for WW1 NZEF service 12 Aug 1914 at Trentham – goes first to Egypt for training; on 25 Apr 1915 he is a “First Day Lander” with the Wellington Battalion at Gallipoli. Killed by a sniper leading an attack between 6 and 10 May 1915. (8th selected arbitrarily) – body not located.

    For his service in WW1, although mother: Annunziata Frandi was NOK, medals were sent to sister Italia [Corich] at 16 Murphy Street, Thorndon, Wgtn. Italia was sent Ateo’s medals in 1922 as follows: 1914/15 Star, British War Medal 1914-18, Victory Medal. Italia also received Ateo’s Memorial Plaque & Scroll (sometimes called Death Plaque, Death Penny, Deadman’s Penny etc) and a Certificate of Service.

    So, Ateo’s medal bar should have SIX medals on it. If you or others in your family are interested, Replica medals are available and can be worn as being representative of a deceased ancestor’s awards – they are permitted to be worn on Anzac Day and Armistice/Remembrance Day by descendant relatives (and …. there is no limit to the number of relatives who can wear a replica set of medals). I can help with his if interested.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    NOW, THIS IS THE GOOD BIT –

    In looking at the files of the brothers, I noted that three went to Gallipoli – Ateo, Alfred and Richard. Only two of these came home. In 1967, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the landings at Gallipoli the Australian and NZ govts struck the ANZAC (Gallipoli) Commemorative Medallion. Eligibility for the plaque was for all living Gallipoli veterans, and the next of kin of those who were killed or who died within two years of leaving Gallipoli/returning home. Those Gallipoli veterans who returned alive also received a miniature version of the plaque with their service number on the back which was a lapel badge.

    The unique thing about the plaque was that it had to be applied for – it was not automatically sent out to families (an impossible task 50 years after the landing anyway). This also allowed the plaques to be engraved with the soldiers name on the back. The medallion was not designed to be worn but comes in a black case and is a display piece.

    Fifty years, on many veterans had died by 1967, or did not hear about the plaque’s availability, were not interested, families were not really aware they could claim for a dead family veteran. There were hundreds left in Defence, but after 100 yrs, all have now been disposed of. As a result of new claims being raised by descendants who have found they would have been entitled (were the alive) brand new ANZAC Plaques are being produced for descendants who are making valid and approved claims (when they hear about it – they do from me).

    I have found no evidence on any of the eligible Frandi men’s files that their ANZAC Plaques have ever been claimed !! Normally there is a stamp on the top page of a file which is signed off and dated on the day the Plaque/lapel badge was issue – there is nothing.

    So far I have arranged for the issue of 5 of these in the last two years that had never been claimed. So, as I see it this may be your lucky blog post. There are three ANZAC Plaques with the Frandi name on them if you want them – some proof of Ancestral connection is required of course, however I can talk you through the requirements and pass you the relevant applications if you are interested (providing they have not already been claimed of course?). Email me if you decide to pursue this and I can get the ball rolling.

    Kind regards

    Ian

    I. D. Martyn
    [Maj. Rtd – NZ Army]
    Medals Reunited New Zealand©
    PO Box 8034
    Nelson Mail Centre
    Nelson 7042
    NEW ZEALAND

    M: +64-27-940-4495
    T: +64-3-546-7728
    E: medalsreunitednz@gmail.com
    W: http://www.medalsreunitednz.co.nz
    FB: facebook.com/medalmanz

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Jess McEwan said:

    Hi Anne. My name is jess and I live in Waimate, New Zealand. Iam messaging you as I think you know or know of my ex, Jason frandi. Are you a relation of his? After these years iam still trying to figure out what happened re: him and the hitchhiker as he treated me like a queen. So I struggle still to understand. Sorry this is so random. I’d love to hear from you and any information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Anne,
    Regards, Jess
    Email: fashion_chic313@yahoo.co.nz

    Like

    • Anne said:

      Hello Jess, I didn’t know Jason personally, but I did receive emails and comments from people who knew him and considered him to be a hardworking, good friend. Most were shocked at what he had done. He killed a woman and then killed himself. I do know that his father was a paedophile who preyed on children, and I have always wondered whether Jason was also abused by his father. Kind regards, Anne.

      Like

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